Fishing In Havana

Cuban Fishing, 3/5/15, Background On Havana As A Starting Point.

Cuban Fishing, 3/5/15:  Getting a feel for Havana is a starting point as we begin thinking about fishing in Cuba.

“Havana (/həˈvænə/; Spanish: La Habana, [la aˈβana]) is the capital city, province, major port, and leading commercial centre of Cuba.[3] The city proper has a population of 2.1 million inhabitants,[2][3] and it spans a total of 728.26 km2 (281.18 sq mi) − making it the largest city by area, the most populous city, and the third largest metropolitan area in the Caribbean region.[2][4] The city extends mostly westward and southward from the bay, which is entered through a narrow inlet and which divides into three main harbours: Marimelena, Guanabacoa and Atarés. The sluggishAlmendares River traverses the city from south to north, entering the Straits of Florida a few miles west of the bay.[5]

The city of Havana was founded by the Spanish in the 16th century and due to its strategic location it served as a springboard for the Spanish conquest of the continent becoming a stopping point for the treasure-laden Spanish galleons on the crossing between the New World and the Old World. KingPhilip II of Spain granted Havana the title of City in 1592.[6] Walls as well as forts were built to protect the old city.[7] The sinking of the U.S. battleship Maine in Havana’s harbor in 1898 was the immediate cause of the Spanish-American War.[8]

Contemporary Havana can essentially be described as three cities in one: Old Havana, Vedado and the newer suburban districts. The city is the center of the Cuban government, and home to various ministries, headquarters of businesses and over 90 diplomatic offices.[9] The current mayor is Marta Hernández from the Communist Party of Cuba (PCC).[10] In 2009, the city/province had the 3rd highest income in the country.[11]

Source:  Havana.

Featured Image: Havana By Sue Kellerman, Via Creative Commons.

Fly Fishing For Bonefish

Cuban Fishing, 3-6-15, Bonefish.

Cuban Fishing, 3/6/15:  Cuba is going to be an extraordinary bonefishing, fly fishing for bone fish, destination for Americans.

“The bonefish (Albula vulpes) is the type species of the bonefish family (Albulidae), the only family in order Albuliformes.

Cuban Fishing, 3-6-15, My First Bonefish By Warren Jackson, Via Creative Commons.
Cuban Fishing, 3-6-15, My First Bonefish By Warren Jackson, Via Creative Commons.

The bonefish weighs up to 19 lb (8.6 kg) and measures up to 90 cm (35 in) long. It is silvery in color with dusky fins. The bases of the pectoral fins are yellow.

An amphidromous species, it lives in inshore tropical waters and moves onto shallow mudflats to feed with the incoming tide. Adults and juveniles may shoal together, and they may be found singly or in pairs.

The bonefish feeds on benthic worms, fry, crustaceans, and mollusks.[1] Ledges, drop-offs, and clean, healthy seagrass beds yield abundant small prey such as crabs and shrimp. It may follow stingrays to catch the small animals they root from the substrate.

Fly fishing for bonefish, called bonefishing, is a popular sport in the Bahamas and southern Florida. Since bonefish live in shallow inshore water, fishing may be done by wading or from a shallow-draft boat. Bonefishing is mostly done for the sport, so the fish are released, but they may also be eaten. A typical recipe is a split fish seasoned with pepper sauce and salt, then baked.[2]

Source:  Bonefish.

Feature Image:  Simon’s Bonefish By David Burton Via Creative Commons.

 

Musings On Fishing & Cuba